The Freedom of the Bay

November 30th, 2015

Photo of a peregrine falcon
At our last meeting we ventured back in time to the last Ice Age, when the Bay was scoured out from the underlying rock by glaciers making their way down from the Scottish Highlands and the peaks of the Lake District. Since then the Bay has been filled with fine silts to a depth of 80m in places, leaving a shallow, productive, estuarine environment. The plants at the bottom of the food-chain in the Bay are microscopic unicellular algae called ‘phytoplankton’, and their lives are governed by the tides and river currents, and they are so small that you may have overlooked them, even though massive numbers of them live in the Bay…

On the 9th December we will turn our attention to two, more visible, groups of wildlife that use the Bay – the fish and the birds. These animals use the winds and the tides, and are able to hunt and explore as they see fit. Among the bird life of the Bay you may spot Percy the peregrine falcon. If you’re lucky you’ll see him doing a ‘fly-past’ over the bay during the autumn and winter and causing a commotion!

‘The Freedom of the Bay’ 19:30hrs Wednesday 9th December at the Gregson Community Centre, Moore Lane, Lancaster LA1 3PY
All welcome – admission £2, proceeds to Lancashire Marine Conservation Society.

The Freedom of the Bay (PDF 55kB).

See our diary for updates or more events.

Peregrine Falcon photo credit: Mike Baird via Wikipedia.

Posted in MCS talks